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ChineseDragonBlueChineseDragonBlueWelcome To That's Life History

History(from Greek ἱστορία, historia, meaning "inquiry, knowledge acquired by investigation") is the study of the past, particularly how it relates to humans.

I especially love Scottish History, so most of the articles that will be posted here will to be about Scottish History, but thats not to say they will not be other articles, any bit of history that I like will be posted.

DurhamPalaceSkeletons found near Durham Cathedral were those of 17th Century Scottish prisoners of war, tests have revealed.

Between 17 and 29 sets of remains were found in a mass grave in 2013 during work on a university library.

The bodies appeared to have been tipped into ground, all jumbled together and without signs of ceremony.

Following detailed study, experts from the university have dated them to 1650, and believe them to be soldiers captured during the Battle of Dunbar.

TheCuriousLegendsofScotlandsCannibalFamiliesAmong the various recurring themes in horror fiction, scenarios that involve the idea of cannibalism have remained a lasting staple. Despite the carnage it presents, we find the motif brilliantly juxtaposed against class and couth with Thomas Harris’ brilliant, but deranged serial killer Hannibal Lecter. However uniquely it is presented, cannibalism in modern horror maintains the premise that carnage, whether out of necessity, or by virtue of choice within a deranged mind, is a real and lasting element of terror.

Though Lecter remains perhaps the most popular, cult classic films within the genre have featured the idea in a number of other forms. One of the greatest among horror film aficionados is Wes Craven’s 1977 film, The Hills Have Eyes, in which a family traveling through a remote stretch of the Nevada desert art besieged by subterranean cannibals that have lived off of those unfortunate enough to have passed through the region.

GlencoeHe is known as the “Curse of Scotland” for his role in the Glencoe Massacre, the government minister whose exploits went largely unpunished following the infamous murders which took place 325 years ago this week.

The killing of 38 members of the MacDonald clan on February 13 1692 by Campbell-led government troops is one of the darkest episodes in the turbulent history of the Highlands.

The victims were killed at daybreak on a freezing winter’s morning by soldiers who had enjoyed 12 nights of MacDonald generosity in the glen.

It was deemed an outrageous affront to both the rule of law as well as the Highland code of hospitality and caused uproar across the country.

TheEileanMorLighthouseMysteryOn the 26th December 1900, a small ship was making its way to the Flannan Islands in the remote Outer Hebridies. Its destination was the lighthouse at Eilean Mor, a remote island which (apart from its lighthouse keepers) was completely uninhabited.

Although uninhabited, the island has always sparked people’s interest. It is named after St. Flannen, a 6th century Irish Bishop who later became a saint. He built a chapel on the island and for centuries shepherds used to bring over sheep to the island to graze but would never stay the night, fearful of the spirits believed to haunt that remote spot.

Captain James Harvey was in charge of the ship which was also carrying Jospeph Moore, a replacement lifehouse keeper. As the ship reached the landing platform, Captain Harvey was surprised not to see anyone waiting for their arrival. He blew his horn and sent up a warning flare to attract attention.

There was no response.

WellOfTheSevenHeadsOn the shores of Loch Oich, near Invergarry in the Scottish Highlands, sits the striking - and slightly curious - Well of the Seven Heads.

The tall needle-like monument is topped by a sculpture of a hand holding a dagger and seven severed heads - a stark reminder of one of the most gruesome episodes in Scottish clan history.

Warfare among the clans was commonplace in the 16th and 17th centuries but this was a bloody tale of internal strife among different sections of one of the largest clans in the Highlands, the Macdonalds.

What is striking about the story of the Well of the Heads is the overwhelming sense of vengeance and power masquerading as justice which typified the clan system and over which the authorities in Scotland had no control.In somewhat typical Highland fashion the story begins with a fight which got out of hand.

TheBattleOfCullodenOn this date, 16 April, in the year 1746, the final battle on British soil was fought at Culloden Battlefield. The battle itself took less than an hour to reach its bloody conclusion. It was not, as often portrayed, a battle between the Scots and the English: large numbers of Scots fought on the Government side while the Jacobite army included French and Irish units. It was the last chapter in a civil war for succession to the throne that had been under way since 1688.

1688 was the year in which King James VII of Scotland and II of England was deposed in favour of William of Orange by a Protestant nobility fearful he was starting a Catholic dynasty. Efforts to restore the Jacobite King to the throne had subsequently led to conflict in 1689, 1708, 1715, and in 1719 when Spanish troops landed in Glen Shiel and captured Eilean Donan Castle.

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