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ChineseDragonBlueChineseDragonBlueWelcome To That's Life History

History(from Greek ἱστορία, historia, meaning "inquiry, knowledge acquired by investigation") is the study of the past, particularly how it relates to humans.

I especially love Scottish History, so most of the articles that will be posted here will to be about Scottish History, but thats not to say they will not be other articles, any bit of history that I like will be posted.

GlencoeHe is known as the “Curse of Scotland” for his role in the Glencoe Massacre, the government minister whose exploits went largely unpunished following the infamous murders which took place 325 years ago this week.

The killing of 38 members of the MacDonald clan on February 13 1692 by Campbell-led government troops is one of the darkest episodes in the turbulent history of the Highlands.

The victims were killed at daybreak on a freezing winter’s morning by soldiers who had enjoyed 12 nights of MacDonald generosity in the glen.

It was deemed an outrageous affront to both the rule of law as well as the Highland code of hospitality and caused uproar across the country.

RuinsofaLegendaryMedievalCastleUncoveredScotlandA legendary castle dating back to the 12th century has been relocated after being lost for more than a century. The building was uncovered during work by Scottish Water in the area of the medieval village of Partick, now Glasgow, in Scotland. The ruins of the castle were swept away by the building of a Victorian railway station.

For decades, archaeologists believed that the castle may have been built in Partick on the banks of the River Kelvin by a king of Strathclyde. The settlement existed from the 7th century, when the first hunting lodge in the area was built. The construction of the castle was linked to the creation of a medieval church in Govan dedicated to St. Constantine, on the other side of a ford across the River Clyde.

DurhamPalaceSkeletons found near Durham Cathedral were those of 17th Century Scottish prisoners of war, tests have revealed.

Between 17 and 29 sets of remains were found in a mass grave in 2013 during work on a university library.

The bodies appeared to have been tipped into ground, all jumbled together and without signs of ceremony.

Following detailed study, experts from the university have dated them to 1650, and believe them to be soldiers captured during the Battle of Dunbar.

WellOfTheSevenHeadsOn the shores of Loch Oich, near Invergarry in the Scottish Highlands, sits the striking - and slightly curious - Well of the Seven Heads.

The tall needle-like monument is topped by a sculpture of a hand holding a dagger and seven severed heads - a stark reminder of one of the most gruesome episodes in Scottish clan history.

Warfare among the clans was commonplace in the 16th and 17th centuries but this was a bloody tale of internal strife among different sections of one of the largest clans in the Highlands, the Macdonalds.

What is striking about the story of the Well of the Heads is the overwhelming sense of vengeance and power masquerading as justice which typified the clan system and over which the authorities in Scotland had no control.In somewhat typical Highland fashion the story begins with a fight which got out of hand.

TheBizarreTheftofACelticSeaGodOne of the most bizarre news stories of 2015 was the January theft of a Celtic sea god. A gang mercilessly smashed the tall, steel and fibreglass statue of Manannán mac Lir, one of Ireland’s most captivating mythological figures. It had been erected in 2013 near a mountain in Derry County overlooking Donegal, the most northerly starting point of the Wild Atlantic Way , a 2,500km route that hugs Ireland’s dramatic west coast.

Mystery surrounds the theft of the statue, but it was believed to be linked to Christian fundamentalists offended by Celtic idolatry. The perpetrators left behind a wooden cross carved with the words “You shall have no other gods before me.”

SkaraBraeOrkneyOn the southern shore of the Bay o' Skaill, in the West Mainland parish of Sandwick, is the Neolithic village of Skara Brae - one of Orkney's most-visited ancient sites and regarded by many as one of the most remarkable monuments in Europe.415

The Neolithic village of Skara Brae was discovered in the winter of 1850. Wild storms ripped the grass from a high dune known as Skara Brae, beside the Bay of Skaill, and exposed an immense midden (refuse heap) and the ruins of ancient stone buildings. The discovery proved to be the best-preserved Neolithic village in northern Europe. And so it remains today.

 

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